Role
Research Scientist - Ecotoxicology in the Sustainable Use of NW Marine Ecosystems program, AIMS
Background
Experimental research scientist based at the AIMS-NT (Darwin) laboratory. Trained in the Netherlands (MSc 2006) and worked for research institutes in the Netherlands, the Dutch Caribbean, the USA, Mozambique and Australia (PhD 2013). Broad experience in ecotoxicology in freshwater and tropical marine receiving environments, in particular bioassay and biomarker development, ecosystem monitoring and environmental risk assessment, accented around quality assurance. Strong experience in field data collections and laboratory activities targeting biological stress assessment. Recent work has focused on method development for generating tropical marine water quality guidelines to assist pollution management and enable compliance testing. Research interests sit in the interface between the fields of wildlife toxicology, marine ecology and sustainable development, and are directed at providing applied approaches linking all parties involved.
Education

2013 - PhD in Environmental Toxicology - University of Queensland, Australia

2006 - MSc in Ecosystem Biology - Wageningen University and Research Centre, Netherlands

Current Research Activities
  • Development of standardised toxicity bioassays, markers and risk assessment procedures to evaluate ecological effects of contamination issues in tropical marine receiving environments.
  • Ecotoxicology and risk assessment of elements associated with alumina refinery discharge.
  • Ecotoxicology and risk assessment of oil spill dispersants.
  • Understanding combined effects of chemical (pollution) and physical (e.g. those associated with global climate change) stressors.
Publications
The following are a selection of recent science publications and reports to industry.

van Dam JW, Trenfield MA, Harries SJ, Streten C, Harford AJ, Parry D, van Dam RA (2016) A novel bioassay using the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite to evaluate chronic effects of aluminium, gallium and molybdenum in tropical marine receiving environments. Marine Pollution Bulletin (in press)

van Dam JW, Trenfield MA, Streten C, Harford AJ, van Dam RA, Gibb K, Parry D (2016) Developing new ecotoxicological methods to protect Australian tropical marine ecosystems. Report prepared for Rio Tinto. Australian Institute of Marine Science, Darwin (116pp)

Trenfield MA, van Dam JW, Harford AJ, Parry D, Streten C, Gibb K, van Dam RA (2016) A chronic toxicity test for the tropical marine snail Nassarius dorsatus to assess the toxicity of copper, aluminium, gallium, and molybdenum. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 35: 1788-1795

van Dam JW, Uthicke S, Beltran VH, Mueller JF, Negri AP (2015) Combined thermal and herbicide stress in functionally diverse coral symbionts. Environmental Pollution 204: 271-279

Trenfield MA, van Dam JW, Harford AJ, Parry D, Streten C, Gibb K, van Dam RA (2015) Aluminium, gallium, and molybdenum toxicity to the tropical marine microalga Isochrysis galbana. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 34: 1833-1840

van Dam JW (2014) Treated Retention Pond 3 (Batman Pit) toxicological report. Report for the Technical Support Group of the Mining Remediation Division of the Northern Territory Department of Mines and Energy. Australian Institute of Marine Science, Darwin

van Dam JW, Negri AP, Mueller JF, Altenburger R, Uthicke S (2012) Additive pressures of elevated sea surface temperatures and herbicides on symbiont-bearing foraminifera. PLoS ONE 7: e33900

van Dam JW, Negri AP, Mueller JF, Uthicke S (2012) Symbiont-specific responses in foraminifera to the herbicide diuron. Marine Pollution Bulletin 65: 373-383.

van Dam JW, Negri AP, Uthicke S, Mueller JF. (2011) Chemical pollution on coral reefs: exposure and ecological effects (Chapter 9) pp 187-211. In: Sanchez-Bayo F, van den Brink PJ, Mann RM (Eds) Ecological impact of toxic chemicals. Bentham Science Publishers Ltd

Schriks M, van Hoorn MK, Faassen EJ, van Dam JW, Murk AJ (2005) Real-time automated measurement of Xenopus laevis tadpole behavior and behavioral responses following triphenyltin exposure using the Multispecies Freshwater Biomonitor (MFB). Aquatic Toxicology 77: 298-305

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